How does your garden grow? With city gardens, the answer is with ingenuity. ‘I always light city gardens more than country gardens in order to create the effect of having another “room” when looking outside at night,’ says Sally Storey, design director of John Cullen Lighting. Whether you have a roof terrace, an itty-bitty balcony or lush cityscape, get inspired by these garden design ideas perfect for city gardens. (Looking for more? Don’t miss these small garden ideas.)

Jinny Blom’s small city garden is a neatly walled space, replanted only months before this photograph was taken. Clipped box cubes contrasts with a clever planting scheme that mixes large-leaved exotic plants with cottage-garden favourites.

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Architect Alan Higgs converted a Georgian pub building in London into a subtly modern flat for himself. He constructed this sleek roof terrace to maximise the natural light within his interiors. A line of pleached trees planted in pots softens his urban rooftop view. The white hydrangeas edging the decking are the perfect floral choice for any minimalist.

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This wisteria-clad pergola in the garden of a London flat designed byCharlotte Crosland provides shade for outdoor dining. Hanging wisteria and striped cushions make this an idyllic outside space.

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Above a west London house designed by Rabih Hage is a vast and gorgeous roof garden. It features iroko decking, a barbecue, a Jacuzzi and enough space to have a great party. The space looks even bigger thanks to the continuous use of wood panelling, expanding the vista up the back wall of the garden.

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This roof terrace makes the most of its incredible architectural view while maintaining complete privacy for the creation of two ‘rooms’; one for dining, the other relaxing. Seasonal flowers soften the planting, while pots are positioned to create focal points and draw the eye. A circular table with a central hornbeam trained to the shape of a parasol offers a creative shade from the sun.

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The double steel doors leading to the terrace were designed by Ebba Thott to give access from the main corridor. A rustic rocking chair and brightly patterned cushion give the London flat’s outdoor space a relaxed atmosphere.

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These colourful parasols are handmade in cornwall by artists Charlie and Katie Napier. Made from either vintage or designer fabrics that have been treated to make them waterproof, each parasol is unique, designed to showcase these special fabrics in an interesting way. The parasols come in three sizes – small (260 x 200cm diameter) medium (270x 250cm diameter), large (280 x 300cm diameter), and cost £1,450, £1,650 and £1,850 respectively, including a canvas cover.sunbeamjackie.com

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At just 1,200 square feet, this is the second smallest house in Manhattan. When two architects, Anne Fairfax and Richard Sammons, bought it, they transformed it to create a bijou interior with a sense of spaciousness that belies its exterior appearance. Leading out of the kitchen is a small enclosed garden with ivy topiary.Lucas-Allen-4-house-5jun14_pr_b_426x639

Struggling for natural light? These steel french windows ensure an abundance of natural light in the sitting room of Jos and Annabel White’s house in Manhattan’s West Village. Try Clement Windows for something on the same scale, which would cost around £9,600 to supply, fix and glaze.

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